www.seidenberg.pace.edu
CONSTANCE KNAPP NAMED INTERIM DEAN
PACE HONORS DEAN SUSAN MERRITT
SEIDENBERG CELEBRATES 25 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE AT ANNUAL FUND-RAISER HONORING KURT WOETZEL
COMPUTER LEARNING CENTER TO OFFER NEW WEB DESIGN CERTIFICATES
GIFTED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ENJOY SUMMER SCHOLAR EXPERIENCE
SEIDENBERG AND SCHOOL OF EDUCATION JOIN FORCES WITH WIREDSAFETY.ORG TO COMBAT CYBERBULLYING
"CIVIC ENGAGEMENT THROUGH COMPUTING TECHNOLOGY " PUBLISHED IN NY TIMES MONOGRAPH
PACE/SKILLPROOF IT INDEX REPORTS STRONG JOB MARKET
SEIDENBERG ENCOURAGES YOUNG WOMEN TO PURSUE CAREERS IN COMPUTING
JOHN BRUTON, EUROPEAN UNION AMBASSADOR TO THE U.S., DISCUSSES THE FUTURE OF E.U.-U.S. RELATIONS
REMEMBERING OUR COLLEAGUE
UPDATE ON IT'S TIME: THE CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN
 
 
CONSTANCE KNAPP NAMED INTERIM DEAN


Constance A. Knapp, PhD
Interim Dean

Constance A. Knapp, PhD, has been named Interim Dean of the Seidenberg School effective July 1. She succeeds Susan Merritt, PhD, who served as Seidenberg's founding dean for 25 years.

Dr. Knapp's appointment to the position was announced on June 12, 2008 in a letter to the Pace community from Geoffrey Brackett, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. In his letter, the Provost expressed confidence in Dr. Knapp as she possesses "a deep understanding of the issues that the school and the University face in the short and long term," and "the intellect, skill and expertise to lead Seidenberg through its current transition."

Dr. Knapp joined Pace in 1985 as lecturer of information systems on the New York City campus and relocated to Westchester in 2002. She received a BS from SUNY - New Paltz, an MBA from Fordham University, and an MPhil and PhD from the City University of New York and currently holds the rank of Professor of Information Systems. She has assumed numerous leadership positions over the years including the co-directorship of the Pforzheimer Faculty Development Center (2002) and, until this appointment, served as the chair of the Seidenberg Faculty Council. Dr. Knapp is highly regarded as a fair but tough-minded manager as well as an outstanding teacher.

As interim dean, Dr. Knapp envisions growth through collaboration with other schools and the development of joint programs "with a focus on technology, transforming courses either as part of course content or delivery." Under her leadership, "Transformation through Technology" may very well become the new Seidenberg School motto.

PACE HONORS DEAN SUSAN MERRITT

At the invitation of Pace President Stephen Friedman and Provost Geoffrey Brackett, several hundred people, including current and past members of the Pace community, Seidenberg's advisory board members, the dean's family, and numerous friends, gathered together to celebrate Dean Susan Merritt's 35 years of dedicated service to Pace as well as 25 years of outstanding leadership as dean of the Seidenberg School. The event was held on Friday, May 9 in Pleasantville.

Dean Susan Merritt displaying collage of her faculty and staff at her celebratory reception

Drs. Joseph Pastore, Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, and Joseph Morreale, former provosts under whom Dean Merritt served, offered words of praise for her leadership. Former Dean Joseph Houle from the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences in which the Seidenberg School, then known as the School of Computer Science and Information Systems, was initially housed, peppered his remarks with considerable humor and Dr. Constance Knapp presented her with a gift on behalf of the Seidenberg Faculty Council.

In a video, Associate Dean Bernice Houle chronicled the highlights of Dean Merritt's early years and tenure as dean, and Lynne Larkin, director of the CLOUT program, presented her with a memory book of key events. Other memorabilia given to the dean included a photo collage of current faculty and staff, a 25-year school timeline, and a digital frame displaying photos of various Seidenberg events.

Dean Merritt began her career at Pace teaching in both the Lubin School of Business and the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. She was appointed the first and founding chair of the Department of Computer Science in 1981 and then became the first and founding dean of the newly established School of Computer Science and Information Systems in 1983. The school was later named the Seidenberg School in 2005 after Ivan G. Seidenberg, chairman and CEO of Verizon Communications, Inc. and Pace alumnus, endowed the school with a $15 million gift. Although Dr. Merritt relinquished the deanship to assume the presidency of the Sisters of Divine Compassion, a religious community, she remains a member of the Pace faculty.

A scholarship fund - the Dean Susan M. Merritt Scholarship in Technology - has been established in recognition of her many accomplishments. To-date, over $25K has been raised. If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to the fund, please contact Susana Piscitiello at (212) 346-1714 or spiscitiello@pace.edu .

SEIDENBERG CELEBRATES 25 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE
AT ANNUAL FUND-RAISER HONORING KURT WOETZEL

The 60th floor of the Chase Manhattan Plaza building with its breathtaking view of New York's harbor was the setting for the school's annual Leadership and Service in Technology Award Reception. Nearly 300 people, representing Pace faculty, students, staff, alumni/ae, friends and members of the IT community, came together to support the event that honored Kurt D. Woetzel, senior executive vice president and CIO of The Bank of New York Mellon.

Provost Geoffrey Brackett (c), presents certificate of recognition to Kurt Woetzel (r), this year's honoree, while Susan Merritt (l), dean, looks on.

Each year the school identifies an individual from the IT community who not only demonstrates outstanding "leadership in the field of technology" but also "innovation in the application of technology to serve people, and commitment to community service and education." Kurt Woetzel's career personifies these criteria. As an industry leader, he is responsible for the company's Information Technology organization worldwide. In this role, he oversees the technical infrastructure, software development, and business processes of an IT organization that is supported by over 5,000 technology professionals. In his role as innovator, he heads up the company's Office of Innovation, where he directs company resources and established processes in support of accelerating new product development and innovation across global markets. In addition, Kurt Woetzel has been an exemplary member of the Seidenberg School Advisory Board and an active supporter of continuing professional education of those who work for him.

Following the presentation of the Leadership and Service in Technology Award, Kurt Woetzel addressed the attendees. In his remarks, he emphasized the pressing need of graduating more people with degrees in the sciences and engineering if the U.S. is not to "lose its edge in its ability to innovate and apply science and technology in practical everyday applications and to maintain its economic well-being in the global economy" and stressed the "need to pique students' interest during their formative years." He applauded the Seidenberg School which is currently celebrating 25 years of excellence for its enormous success "in bringing science and technology programs to children and education to people from a wide range of cultures and geographies." And the school, in turn, is appreciative of the substantial scholarship dollars Kurt Woetzel has helped to raise, not only this year but in years past.

The annual award reception is the school's primary fund-raiser. Proceeds from the event go toward scholarships for students with need as well as toward numerous academic initiatives. This year's proceeds totaled nearly $215K. Special thanks for the success of this year's Leadership and Service in Technology Award Reception also go out to advisory board members Carl Morales, senior vice president & CTO, Enterprise Technology at MetLife, and Howard Medow, vice president and managing director, Financial Services of Modis, Inc., who co-chaired the event as well as to Charles Costa, Executive Technology and Operations, Asset Management of JPMorgan Chase, who secured the stunning venue for our use.

COMPUTER LEARNING CENTER TO OFFER NEW WEB DESIGN CERTIFICATES

The Computer Learning Center will offer a Certificate in Web Design I, beginning September 8, 2008. The class will be held two evenings a week, with sections in both White Plains and Midtown.

Developed in response to requests from corporate and individual clients, the goal of the 45-hour class is to develop both the technology skills and accompanying soft skills that will enable participants to plan, design, build, troubleshoot, promote and maintain a robust, fully functional Web site with e-commerce capability.

Using a platform of Adobe CS3 applications, including Photoshop Illustrator, Fireworks, Dreamweaver and Flash, students will learn these applications separately and then use them together as they build a sophisticated and
full-featured Web site. While students must be experienced with the PC and have advanced mouse skills, no prior knowledge of Adobe applications is required. The class will be followed by an optional continuation, Certificate in Web Design II, which will build upon competencies introduced in the first class and will take students to a higher level of proficiency and experience.

For more information, or to register, call PCLC at (914) 422-4328 or (212) 346-1222.

GIFTED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ENJOY SUMMER SCHOLAR EXPERIENCE

For the third consecutive year, a group of gifted high school students participated in the Seidenberg School Summer Experience hosted by the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. This program was created as a means of identifying and recruiting students for the school's Seidenberg Scholars Program and of advancing its reputation as a nationally prominent and innovative school of computing. Students admitted to the Seidenberg Scholars Program receive a full scholarship, automatic acceptance into the Pforzheimer Honors College, a free laptop, and other special benefits.

High school students participating in the Seidenberg School Summer Experience working on their LEGO robotic challenges.

Chosen from over a hundred applicants, 36 high school juniors - 12 young women and 24 young men - came to the New York City campus to take part in a challenging but fun-filled academic experience, meet other like-minded students, and enjoy a taste of the "Big Apple." In addition to those from the tristate area, they came from as far away as Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, the U.S. Virgin Islands and other places in-between.

Upon arrival, the students were assigned roommates and dorm rooms. Shortly thereafter, they were divided into teams of six and introduced to the academic challenges developed by Dr. Richard Kline. The challenges focused on harnessing alternative energy; solutions were to be devised through the programming of LEGO robotics tools. The teams were required to complete two of four challenges, each involving different forms or applications of energy including solar, wind and geothermal. Three hours were set aside each day for students to work on their projects. At the end of the experience, the more creative solutions were presented to the group as a whole as well as to Provost Geoffrey Brackett, the faculty, staff, and parents in attendance.

The remainder of the time was filled with a variety of activities. On Friday, June 26, the Summer Scholars visited IBM's Industry Solutions Lab (ISL) at the T. J. Watson Research Center in Hawthorne, NY followed by a stop at the Pleasantville campus. Saturday included a scavenger hunt at the Museum of Natural History, a walk through Central Park, and pizza for dinner in Times Square. On their last night, they ate at an authentic Chinese restaurant in Chinatown and were taken to see an off-Broadway production, JUMP! Adithya Balasubramanian from Virginia said, "the show was a great pick." After the show, the students indulged in an ice cream party at Alphabet Scoop on the Lower East Side.

The participants appeared to enjoy the entire experience. Many expressed interest in applying to Pace. Lydia Skrabonja, of New Jersey, said, "It was one of the most rewarding experiences of my life and I am sure to remember it forever. The opportunity to interact with students from around the country with the same interests as mine was fantastic. I am also appreciative of the experience of meeting other women interested in pursuing a major in technology."

SEIDENBERG AND SCHOOL OF EDUCATION JOIN FORCES WITH WIREDSAFETY.ORG TO COMBAT CYBERBULLYING

Parry Aftab (l), founder of wiredsafety.org, and Ryan (c), a "tweenangel" after presenting Ivan Seidenberg (r), CIO at Verizon, with a Superhero Award

Over 700 concerned individuals including students, parents, educators, and industry and media representatives, among others, attended the 1st International Stop Cyberbullying Conference hosted by the Seidenberg School and WiredSafety.org, a rapidly growing cybersafety organization. The two-day conference was held on June 2 at the Westchester County Center in White Plains and on June 3 at the Michael Schimmel Theater on the New York City campus.

The issue of harassment over the Internet, known as cyberbullying, is of increasing concern to both parents and educators. With children spending more time online and participating in popular social networking sites such as MySpace, the incidence of cyberbullying is rapidly increasing. This issue first received national attention in 2006 when Megan Meier, a teenager from Missouri, committed suicide after receiving a spate of nasty e-mail messages from someone she believed to be her friend. Tina Meier, Megan's mother, gave the keynote address at the conference and introduced "The Megan Pledge." One of the tenets of the pledge binds those taking it "not to use technology to hurt others."

At the conclusion of the conference, it was announced that Pace University, through Seidenberg and the School of Education, would join forces with WiredSafety.org to actively combat cyberbullying. Beginning fall 2008, a multi-pronged pilot program will be launched to attack this complex problem. The main components of the program include:

  • Development of cybersafety workshops for middle-school parents and caregivers to be given in the NY Metro-area schools by Pace faculty and student volunteers;

  • Revision of the existing Computers for Human Empowerment course that will prepare Pace undergraduates to go out into schools and coach students in grades 4-9 in the safe and responsible use of the Internet and other digital technologies. This course can be applied toward their Civic Engagement requirement in the core curriculum;

    This component in the battle against cyberbullying will also involve the deployment of "tween" and "teenangels" who have been trained to speak directly to their peers about proper Internet conduct in their own language. This approach, developed by WiredSafety.org, has been in use for some time and has proved to be an effective strategy;

  • Offering of a new, three-course sequence for educators leading to a graduate-level Certificate in Cybersafety and Wired Trust's Web 2.0 Risk Management for Schools;

  • Inclusion of Internet safety modules in teacher-certification courses offered at Pace such as those in Child Abuse, Human Development, and Educational Technology, drawing on WiredSafety.org methods.

The Pace/WiredSafety pilot program is initially expected to reach more than 100 future teachers and administrators, plus current teachers taking courses, each of whom has an impact on at least 30 students. In addition, it will reach parents, caregivers and students in the New York City and Westchester County schools to which Pace sends students as interns and volunteers. Assuming the pilot program is successful, efforts will then be made to reach a wider audience including the possibility of online instruction backed by WiredSafety's reputation as an advocate for Internet safety and Pace's online expertise.

The Stop Cyberbullying Conference was conceived and organized by Parry Aftab, the founder and executive director of WiredSafety.org. She is a security, privacy and cyberspace lawyer who has written and lectured widely on online safety and parent and child Internet education. WiredSafety.org had been looking to collaborate with a university in order to further its educational mission. "We had been looking for a university partner, and Pace stepped forward at just the right time," said Parry Aftab.

"CIVIC ENGAGEMENT THROUGH COMPUTING TECHNOLOGY " PUBLISHED IN NY TIMES MONOGRAPH

 
"Civic Engagement through Computing Technology" was recently published in First-Year Civic Engagement: Sound Foundations for College, Citizenship and Democracy by The New York Times as a monograph. The monograph was co-authored by many of the Seidenberg faculty who have developed and taught the innovative service learning courses that are open to all Pace undergraduates. The authors include Drs. Jean Coppola, Susan Feather-Gannon, Darren Hayes, Richard Kline, and Pauline Mosley as well as Professors Catherina Daniels, Nancy Hale and Linda Pennachio. Heather Novack, assistant director of Project Pericles, is also cited as a co-author.

In addition, The Times plans to publish online related case studies on intergenerational computing, Web design for nonprofit organizations, computers for human empowerment, problem solving using LEGOs, and computer technology, in the near future. These case studies delve into the specific content upon which our civic engagement courses are built.

As a result of authoring this monograph, the faculty were invited to participate in a panel discussion at a conference sponsored by the American Colleges and Universities on "Intentional Learning, Unscripted Challenges: Knowledge and Imagination for an Interdependent World" in Washington, DC in January.

Dr. Jean Coppola sat on the panel as faculty representative. Other panelists, included Dr. Andrew Wingfield from George Mason University, Roxanne Moayedi from Trinity University in Washington, DC, and Joni Doherty from Franklin Pierce University. Martha LaBare from Bloomfield College (NJ) and editor of The Times publication, led the discussion. The panel discussion was well-received and many in the audience wanted to learn more about Pace's creative approach to providing a meaningful service learning experience to its students.

PACE/SKILLPROOF IT INDEX REPORTS STRONG IT JOB MARKET




While many sectors of the job market are taking a beating in the current economy, the market for IT positions remains strong according to the latest Pace/SkillPROOF IT Index Report issued by the Seidenberg School. To learn just how resilient the IT job market is and which positions are in demand, check the listing at PSII Report.

SEIDENBERG ENCOURAGES YOUNG WOMEN TO PURSUE CAREERS IN COMPUTING

Interestingly enough, this year's Women in Computing event held on March 7 on the New York City campus coincided with International Women's Day, a worldwide celebration of women and their potential. Women in Computing, established and hosted by the Seidenberg School, is an annual gathering of high school girls from throughout New York City to make them aware of the many exciting career opportunities available in computing. Over 350 young women attended this year's event.

High school students asking questions at Women in Computing event

The Seidenberg School initiated this conference and other activities focusing on the involvement of women in computing in an effort to reverse the continuous decline in the number of baccalaureate degrees in the computing disciplines awarded to women since 1985. By inviting successful women with computer-related careers to speak to high school students about the interesting and well-paid work they do, the speakers serve as role models for the young women as they begin to think about college and their career options.

The keynote address was delivered by Abha Kumar, principal of Internet Technology at the Vanguard Group. She was followed by Lindsay Rutter, Developer Evangelist at Microsoft, who spoke about the industry and the advantages of being a woman in computing. A panel discussion followed featuring Lindsay Rutter and Sandra Shaw of Microsoft, Helen Uzamere of Pace University, and Erika Watkins of Smart Technology Services.

The participants then split of into breakout sessions focusing on careers, social networking, computer forensics, social justice and technology, the impact of technology on Election 2008, ethical hacking, LEGO robotics, Web design, and tips on navigating the corporate world. The sessions were conducted by Seidenberg students and faculty along with the participating professionals. One attendee said that "The LEGO presentation was really interesting. I think I would consider taking a course like that in college." The conference ended with the awarding of prizes donated by Microsoft, the corporate sponsor of this year's event.

The young women enjoyed their day at Pace and left with a greater understanding of computing as a profession and the diverse opportunities that await women in this exciting field.

JOHN BRUTON, EUROPEAN UNION AMBASSADOR TO THE U.S., DISCUSSES THE FUTURE OF E.U.-U.S. RELATIONS

John Bruton (r), EU Ambassador to the U.S., with Dr. Carol Wolf (l) and Dr. Darren Hayes (c).

At the invitation of Seidenberg faculty member Dr. Darren Hayes, John Bruton, European Union Ambassador to the U.S., addressed a number of important political, economic and technical issues affecting both the U.S. and the European Union (E.U.) before an audience of students, faculty, staff and outside guests on the downtown campus on Wednesday, April 16.

The Ambassador affirmed the importance of E.U.-U.S. relations by noting that this partnership accounts for 40 percent of world trade, which translates into $1 billion a day. Investment links amass to a staggering $1.8 trillion annually. The Ambassador also pointed out the number of similarities between the United States and the European Union. Both economies are similar in size and both entities are a union of states. The European Court of Justice is very similar to the U.S. Supreme Court; the European Parliament is similar to the House of Representatives; and the Council of Ministers is close in structure to the U.S. Senate. However, the European Union is treaty-based and comprised of independent nation-states that are free to leave at any time and, unlike the United States, the European Union cannot tax or prosecute individual citizens.

In addition to the E.U.'s interest in promoting peace in Iraq and between Israel and her neighbors, Ambassador Bruton expressed that the E.U. is particularly concerned about the growing worldwide food crisis as food prices have been rising rapidly and many African and other Third World nations are on the verge of starvation. These issues, including those relating to the environment, are of concern to both the E.U. and the U.S.

John Bruton is a former Irish Prime Minister, who helped transform the Irish economy into the "Celtic Tiger," one of the fastest growing economies in the world. In the year before he took office (1993), the Irish economy grew by 2.7 percent. During his time in office (1994-1997), it grew at an annual average rate of 8.7 percent, peaking at 11.1 percent in 1997. He was also deeply involved in the Northern Irish Peace Process leading to the 1998 Good Friday Agreement, which helped bring a conflict of allegiances dating back to the 17th century to an end. While Prime Minister, Ambassador Bruton presided over a successful Irish E.U. Presidency in 1996 and helped finalize the Stability and Growth Pact that governs the management of the Euro.

REMEMBERING OUR COLLEAGUE
Michael L. Gargano, PhD

Michael L. Gargano, PhD

Michael L. Gargano, PhD, a professor of computer science in the Seidenberg School and a professor of mathematics in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, passed away on Saturday, May 31, 2008, after suffering a series of heart attacks.

Dr. Gargano joined the Pace faculty in 1980 and served as the first chair of the computer science department on the New York City campus. He was a prolific researcher who published widely and organized and participated in numerous conferences. He was interested in a broad range of topics including genetic algorithms, neural networks and graph theory, among others. He was known as a creative teacher who was loved by his students. He actively promoted interdisciplinary education in computer science and mathematics, and more recently in biology.

Mike Gargano had a warm and engaging personality. Louis Quintas, PhD, a retired professor of mathematics and close friend and colleague, expressed it well saying "It was a pleasure to be with Mike. He always had a joke to tell or a friendly challenge on the meaning of some word or a tantalizing scientific problem to encourage those around him to keep smiling and thinking."

Mike is survived by his wife Phyllis who teaches math at the Saint Paul's School in Congers, NY, and his son Michael Jr., who earned an MS in computer science from Pace.

UPDATE ON IT'S TIME: THE CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN

The university continues to make excellent progress towards its capital campaign goal of $100 million. To-date, over $84 million has been raised. The Seidenberg School has exceeded its $20 million dollar goal and is now at $20.8 million through the combined efforts of Susan Merritt, Dean Emeritus; Kimberly Bendus, Seidenberg's former development director; and the Office of Philanthropy.

Since 2003, 517 individuals, corporations and foundations have made contributions with 58 at the $5,000 or higher level and 86 in the $1,000 - $4,999 range.

Seidenberg is optimistic that it will substantially exceed its goal. If you would like to help with this effort and contribute to the Seidenberg School segment of the capital campaign, please contact Jessica Gillota, resident campaign director, at (212) 346-1290.