www.seidenberg.pace.edu
NAOMI SELIGMAN, CIO STRATEGY EXCHANGE CO-CHAIR, TO BE HONORED
SEIDENBERG STUDENT NAMED PRESTIGIOUS CRA AWARD FINALIST
FIRST LEGO LEAGUE TOURNAMENT A GREAT SUCCESS
ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER RECEIVES HIGHLY COVETED TURING AWARD
ODYSSEY OF AN INDIAN ALUMNUS: SHANKAR GOPAL
SEIDENBERG DEAN AND SCHOOL LAUDED FOR DIVERSITY EFFORTS
SEIDENBERG SCHOOL RECEIVES SLOAN FOUNDATION "LOCALNESS" GRANT
SEIDENBERG INTRODUCES DOCTORAL PROGRAM FOR EDUCATION PROFESSIONALS
SEIDENBERG SCHOOL DEVELOPS COMPUTER FORENSICS PROGRAM FOR NEW YORK CITY SCHOOLS
CLOUT PROMOTES COMMUNITY AMONG ITS STUDENTS
PACE/SkillPROOF IT JOB INDEX REPORT WELL-RECEIVED
LEARNING CENTER TO BECOME AUTHORIZED ADOBE TRAINING CENTER
SEIDENBERG IN THE NEWS
ALUMNI GIVING
 
 
NAOMI SELIGMAN, CIO STRATEGY EXCHANGE CO-CHAIR, TO BE HONORED
Ivan G. Seidenberg to Serve as Guest Speaker

Naomi Seligman
On June 5th, 2007, the Seidenberg School will be celebrating its 12th Annual Leadership and Service in Technology Award Reception. This year's honoree is Naomi Seligman, a true innovator in information technology and information systems, who currently co-chairs the influential CIO Strategy Exchange. Ms. Seligman is a senior partner with Ostriker von Simson, Inc., a technology research firm.

Naomi Seligman, whose career spans decades, has pioneered creative and innovative IT strategies and solutions. The multinational forums she has worked to create and oversee have helped to identify the primary opportunities and challenges in the IT sector and have served to open the dialogue among establishment CEO's from the top 10 computer companies, multinational enterprise CIO's, representative enterprise customers, and the entrepreneurial leadership of truly innovative emerging technology firms - all culminating in an unparalleled perspective on the most promising areas of IT innovation and investment, product need, and service placement.

As a senior partner with Ostriker von Simson, Inc., she has again enabled the establishment and implementation of creative IT strategies concerning the assessment, acquisition, monitoring, and management of emerging technologies and technology related ventures by the world's largest corporations. Her tireless work in the development of technology strategies and unique applications, innovative technology solutions and collaborations, and their collective implications for multibillion dollar, multinational enterprises to serve people and business globally make her a deserving recipient of the 2007 Leadership and Service in Technology Award.


[ To learn more ]


SEIDENBERG STUDENT NAMED PRESTIGIOUS CRA AWARD FINALIST
Tom Achtemichuk cited for outstanding research

Thomas Achtemichuk
(BS/CS '07)
Thomas Achtemichuk, a recent BS in Computer Science graduate from the New York City campus, was named a finalist in this year's Outstanding Undergraduate Awards competition sponsored by the Computing Research Association (CRA) in late November. The award is based on demonstrated excellence in computing research ability and is considered one of the most prestigious honors an undergraduate computer science student in the U.S. can receive. In addition to making a significant contribution to a substantial research project, the selection committee also takes the applicant's academic record and service to the community into account. Dean Susan Merritt, upon learning of the award, remarked that Tom's designation was "outstanding." This award places Tom alongside students from such high-ranking institutions as Stanford, Carnegie Mellon and Harvard.

Tom, a Canadian from Vancouver, B.C., came to Pace as a transfer student in 2004, having completed two years of study at the University of British Columbia. During his first semester at Pace, Dr. Paul Benjamin, director of the school's Robotics Lab, identified Tom as a promising researcher and invited him to participate in the research activity going on in the lab. Initially, Tom provided support to graduate students working on their theses but by the next year he was working independently, pursuing research in predictive computer vision and mobile robot navigation. His work ultimately resulted in a paper titled "Obstacle Avoidance using Predictive Vision Based on a Dynamic 3D World Model" that he presented at the SPIE Optics East Conference held in Boston last October. It was this outstanding work that prompted Dr. Benjamin and Dr. Dennis Anderson, associate dean, to nominate him for the CRA award. In the words of Dr. Benjamin, his mentor, "Tom performed some really excellent work in computer vision, which he presented at a conference in Boston. The CRA recognized that his work demonstrates that Tom has all the qualities that a good computer scientist needs."

In addition to his research, Tom gave numerous talks on open source technology and Linux and was the first Seidenberg undergraduate student to ever serve as a tutor to both undergraduate and graduate students. Tom completed his degree in January with a QPA of 3.86.

The award is to be presented at a recognized research conference in the near future.

FIRST LEGO LEAGUE TOURNAMENT A GREAT SUCCESS
Junior Expos Well Attended

Pace University, under the leadership of Bernice Houle, associate dean in the Seidenberg School, once again hosted the annual FIRST LEGO League (FLL) Tournament on Sunday, February 11th on the Pleasantville campus. Nearly 100 teams of children from local schools, Girl Scout troops, and regional neighborhoods came together for the event in which teams program robots made from LEGOs to accomplish predesignated tasks. The tournament is run solely by volunteers, including Seidenberg students, athletes, resident assistants, staff and faculty, and members of the Westchester community. This year there were approximately 150 volunteers. Judges were from major corporations in the area, including IBM's TJ Watson Research Center, Apple Computer, and Quintel Consulting.

Attendees Viewing Team Robotics Demos
in Goldstein Fitness Center, Pleasantville

Each year, the focus of the tournament is a different internationally announced challenge. The theme this year was Nano Quest. As visionaries and scientists, the FIRST LEGO League teams explored amazing new technologies that impact every facet of society from medicine to computers to the environment. Nano Quest missions included manipulating individual atoms, constructing an elevator to outer space, developing cures for disease, making clothes that never get dirty, and smelling pizza molecules.

Teams of children, ages 9-14, are required to build and program robots to accomplish these missions as well as to research and present their own applications of nanotechnology to improve people's lives. In addition to the tournament missions, the teams were judged on robot design and programming, a 10-minute research presentation, and demonstrated teamwork.


[ To learn more ]

ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER RECEIVES HIGHLY COVETED TURING AWARD
Fran Allen Cracks the Glass Ceiling for Women in Science

Fran Allen
2007 Turing Award Recipient
The Seidenberg School was proud to learn that Fran Allen, a member of its Advisory Board and longtime friend, was named the recipient of this year's Turing Award for her outstanding contributions to computer science. This award marks the first time that a woman has received this honor. The award was named for Alan M. Turing, a well-known British mathematician, and is considered the "Nobel Prize in Computing."

Fran Allen initially joined IBM in 1957 as a FORTRAN instructor. Here intention was to stay on for a year or two to earn enough money to pay off her college debt and then become a full-time math teacher. However, becoming involved in the emerging field of computer science was too alluring to pass up. She stayed at IBM for 45 years and made remarkable contributions in the area of program optimization which, simply put, refers to the conversion of programming code from that written by humans to that which is understood and executable by computers. Rozena Bajcsy, Chair of the Turing Award Committee, said of Fran Allen's work: "Her contributions have spanned most of the history of computer science, and have made possible computing techniques that we rely on today in business and technology."

Over the years, her accomplishments have earned her considerable recognition and numerous awards. In 1989 she was the first woman to be named an IBM Fellow. In 2000, IBM created the Frances E. Allen Women in Technology Mentoring Award and named her its first recipient. And in 1997, she was honored by the School of Computer Science and Information Systems with its Leadership and Service in Technology Award for her outstanding contributions in technology, innovation in the application of technology, and commitment to community service and education.


[ To learn more ]

ODYSSEY OF AN INDIAN ALUMNUS: SHANKAR GOPAL

Shankar Gopal
(MS/CS '91)
Shankar Gopal, MS/CS '91, came to the U.S. to study computer science in 1989 at a time when his opportunities for employment, much less advancement, were limited in his native India. Like many other Indian students who flooded into the U.S. in the 1990's, he earned a graduate degree and found a place in the booming U.S. IT industry. As the IT revolution expanded globally, he found himself back in India as an employee of a U.S.-based multinational company and is riding the wave of India's ascension as a major economic power. Today he is the Director of Technical Operations for AOL India. Here is his story.

When I graduated with a degree in mechanical engineering in 1988, I was inspired by my co-workers and mentors at the Indian Institute of Science where I worked to pursue a master's degree in the U.S.  Those were the days of socialist India -- non-global with a stagnant economy. There weren't many opportunities for engineers and if an engineer did not graduate from a top institution with top ranking, chances for advancement would be even more limited. In addition, computer science was a new, emerging field, exciting but only available in the IITs and the other highly ranked institutions. Curious and eager to pursue a career in computer science, I moved to the U.S. in 1989 and enrolled in Pace's MS in Computer Science program. Earlier conversations with Dr. Murthy, chair of the Computer Science Department in Westchester, about opportunities in the U.S. influenced my decision.

Pace was an ideal choice for me. It was close to Manhattan, had a diverse student body, and a flexible curriculum that accommodated people with different interests and academic preparation. My first semester wasn't easy given that I had never touched a computer in my entire life, but the supportive faculty helped a great deal. Also, Pace's class schedule made it possible for me to earn and learn which was a big help given my limited financial resources. An additional benefit was the fact that a large percentage of students were employed in related fields, making the classes even more infomative and interesting when they shared their work experiences.

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SEIDENBERG DEAN AND SCHOOL LAUDED FOR DIVERSITY EFFORTS

Dean Susan Merritt and Jamie Newland, PhD (Lienhard) pose with their awards
On Friday, January 26, Dean Susan Merritt and the Seidenberg School were presented with the Martin Luther King, Jr. Excellence in Social Justice Award at the university's annual event commemorating the slain civil rights leader. This is the second year that the award has been conferred by the Office of Diversity on the Pleasantville campus.

Dean Merritt was honored for her vision and leadership which have helped to make the Seidenberg School a leader in the areas of diversity and social justice. The school, including faculty and staff, were cited for pursuing numerous initiatives in this arena including recommending students for endowed and outside scholarship opportunities, providing individualized advisement and assistance, supporting the CLOUT program, and developing and offering civic engagement courses as part of the university's core curriculum that promote social awareness.

SEIDENBERG SCHOOL RECEIVES SLOAN FOUNDATION "LOCALNESS" GRANT

On December 12, 2006 the Seidenberg School was awarded a $250,000 grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation . The grant provides funds that will permit the School to undertake several new local initiatives. One initiative will focus on partnerships with regional high schools, another on partnerships with regional community colleges, a third on marketing, and a final one on the development of new and better support systems that should significantly enhance student satisfaction within the school. It is anticipated that these initiatives will result in increased enrollment and more comprehensive and accurate information for students.

This grant, obtained through the efforts of Dr. Susan Merritt, dean, and Dr. David Sachs, associate dean, is the newest in a series of Sloan Foundation Grants awarded to the school and dating back to 1995 in support of various innovative initiatives. They include the development of online programs for telecommunications workers, and support for those directly impacted by the attacks of 9/11 in the form of additional online course offerings and financial supplementation to area businesses seeking to hire student cooperative education employees to assist them in rebuilding.

The impact of the new initiatives is expected to be felt within a short time period.


SEIDENBERG INTRODUCES DOCTORAL PROGRAM FOR EDUCATION PROFESSIONALS

Students in the DPS for Education Technology Professionals Program --Class of 2009--
with David Sachs, PhD
Beginning fall 2006, the Seidenberg School expanded its Doctor of Professional Studies in Computing program to include a track for education professionals. Like the highly successful track for industry professionals that has been in existence since 1999, the program allows working education professionals to continue advancing in their careers while pursuing a doctorate on a part-time basis.

Features of the program that appeal to working professionals include monthly weekend classes enhanced by ongoing interaction with faculty and fellow classmates over the Internet as well as a curriculum structured to help students finish the program in three years including the completion of the dissertation. Students enter as a cohort and quickly become part of a supportive learning community in which they share their ideas and professional expertise.

Currently, there are 17 students enrolled in the new program. The class includes educational administrators, librarians, technology specialists and teachers. Asked to comment on the DPS upon completion of her first semester, Christine Coleman , Director of Technology, City School District of New Rochelle stated:

"Pace has developed a doctoral program of study for technology educational professionals that is comprehensive, convenient, and challenging! For me it is the next step of my professional career and a continuation of my commitment to lifelong learning."


[ To learn more about the DPS for Education Technology Professionals ]

SEIDENBERG SCHOOL DEVELOPS COMPUTER FORENSICS PROGRAM FOR NEW YORK CITY SCHOOLS

Beginning in spring 2006, a curriculum development team from the Seidenberg School started working with technology teachers from three New York City public high schools to develop an interdisciplinary model curriculum for teaching the elements of computer forensics. The program is a joint effort between two of the Department of Education's (DOE) special programs, the Academy of Information Technology which runs computing technology programs in more than 80 New York City public high schools, and the Justice Resource Center which provides pre-legal education for the City high schools. "We had been looking for a program that could combine the emerging use of technology in law with the respective skills that our law students and technology students were learning. The computer forensics program has been perfect for that and the Pace team has brought an unbelievable level of professionalism and excitement to the program," said Justice Resource Center Director, Debra Lesser.

The Pace team, under the direction of Dean Susan M. Merritt, includes staff and faculty, including Dennis Anderson, PhD; Professors Nancy Hale, Darren Hayes and Jonathan Hill and Steven Sumner, PhD. In addition, Pace has leveraged the knowledge of experts from the field of high technology law enforcement including Pace students who are current members of the New York Police Department.

The high school teachers meet on a monthly basis with the Pace curriculum development team to learn the concepts and talk about what worked well in the classroom. While the program has been a great professional development opportunity for these teachers, the program has also been of great value to the high school students who are enrolled in it. According to Washington Irving High School Assistant Principal Julie Bingay-Lopez, who oversees the InfoTech House program at the school, attendance for students enrolled in the computer forensics course is significantly higher than the school average. "The kids in this program are excited and motivated by what they are learning" she said.


[ To learn more ]

CLOUT PROMOTES COMMUNITY AMONG ITS STUDENTS

CLOUT students and their children enjoy a picnic on the Pleasantville campus
CLOUT, the highly successful program run by the Seidenberg School that helps individuals move from welfare to gainful employment as office professionals, really cares about its students. Most of the students enrolled in the program are single mothers with young children. With the pressures of going to school, raising children alone and trying to get by on limited financial resources, there is precious little time for recreation or just plain fun. The CLOUT staff, headed by Lynne Larkin, tries hard to remedy this situation by organizing a number of activities outside the classroom that bring students, sometimes with their children, together. Events include field trips to corporate headquarter sites such as Heineken USA, an annual Back-to-School event at which clothing and school supplies are given to the children, and a holiday toy drive.

For the first time this academic year and prior to the start of classes, a picnic was held for all members of the CLOUT community - the students, their children, faculty, and staff. Over 100 people attended the event on the Pleasantville campus for a day filled with fun, food and a few informal educational experiences for the children including a visit to the Pace Environmental Center, a treasure hunt, and story time in the Mortola Library, and a LEGO robot building session. Everyone involved had a wonderful time, particularly the children.

[ To view more photos ]

Because the CLOUT program is located in the Graduate Center in White Plains, many students have never been to the Pleasantville campus. This was their first opportunity to see what Pleasantville had to offer and where they would attend classes if they choose to continue on for a degree after completing the one-year, 18 credit certificate program.

Members of the CLOUT staff, Faith Faulk and Linda Pennachio, have also encouraged the students to publish their own newsletter to enhance communication. The newsletter, appropriately named "We've Got CLOUT!" first appeared in December and includes information on past and upcoming events, a Poetry Corner, and reflections on the CLOUT experience by recent graduates.


[ To read newsletter ]

PACE/SkillPROOF IT JOB INDEX REPORT WELL-RECEIVED


The Pace/SkillPROOF IT Job Index Report (PSII) , introduced in November under the auspices of the Seidenberg School , was very well received by business professionals and educators. In addition, the Index has sparked considerable interest on the part of the press. The report, based on data mined from Fortune 500 company listings in 11 job categories and analyzed by Farrokh Hormozi, PhD, a well respected econometrician from Pace, gauges the demand for IT professionals in the various job categories in both Manhattan and Westchester County in separate analyses. A second report summarizing 2006 and looking forward into 2007 was issued in early January. It confirmed that the IT job market in Manhattan is strong and that the Westchester market rebounded substantially last year.

The PSII is published on the second Tuesday of the month following each business quarter. A shorter update of IT job market conditions or unusual developments will be unveiled shortly and published during the mid-point of each quarter to help employers, IT professionals, educators, and students stay abreast of market developments.


[ To learn more ]

LEARNING CENTER TO BECOME AUTHORIZED ADOBE TRAINING CENTER

The Pace Computer Learning Center (PCLC) will soon add Adobe to its growing list of premier partner programs. PCLC recently became a Linux Red Hat Academy partner and a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute.

In order to become an Authorized Adobe Training Center, PCLC must hire instructors who have passed a challenging two-part exam that qualifies them as an Adobe Certified Instructor. PCLC will soon be offering training on the most current versions of Adobe software products with certified instructors. The benefit to its customers is that they know that they are participating in a program recognized for quality in the industry. PCLC's Adobe Certified Instructors have demonstrated teaching competency as well as expert mastery of Adobe software tools.

The Center will be offering new courses in Flash, Dreamweaver, Photoshop, InDesign, and other applications as the program continues to grow. For more information, contact Jim Irvine, Program Manager -PCLC- 914-422-4054.

SEIDENBERG IN THE NEWS

Interest in the new Pace/SkillPROOF IT Job Index, success in promoting diversity within the school and ultimately in the workplace, and our efforts to encourage young children to discover the excitement and challenge of science and technology through our hosting of the FIRST LEGO League robotic tournaments, continues to attract the press.

Recent coverage includes:

Job Index Report -

Diversity -

FIRST LEGO League Tournament -

  • "LEGO Brains," hallmonitor.lohudblogs.com (February 13, 2007)

A clip from the first Junior FIRST LEGO League Expo held on the New York City campus on Saturday, February 10 appeared on News 12 Brooklyn and on WNBC TV.

Coverage of the tournaments held on the Pleasantville campus on Sunday, February 11 aired on News 12 Westchester that evening.

ALUMNI GIVING

Are you aware that there are numerous ways to provide financial support to Pace?

One way is to contribute to the Pace University Annual Fund . Your gift helps to:

  • attract the most talented students;
  • fund scholarships, new technologies, and innovative programs;
  • retain a world-class faculty.

To make your gift to the Pace Annual Fund, please go to www.pace.edu/givetopace or send your check, payable to Pace University , to Annual Giving, Office of Philanthropy, One Pace Plaza, New York, NY, 10038 And when you make your contribution, you may specify that you would like it to go to the Seidenberg School. For more information, contact Nicole Souza at (212) 346-1232 or nsouza@pace.edu .

Another option is to give to Pace and receive income for life or a specified number of years through Planned Giving . In addition to benefiting from an income tax deduction, you can also direct your gift to an existing or newly created fund within the Seidenberg School as a way of establishing your legacy at Pace. For more information, please go to www.pace.edu/PlannedGiving.






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